Expecting a baby? Protect yourself and your baby with your free COVID-19 vaccination.

Over 81,000 pregnant women in England have accessed their COVID-19 vaccine, helping protect themselves, their families, and their communities.

If you’re pregnant or thinking about having a baby, don’t forget that you have free access to important vaccinations that will keep you and your baby safe.

For example, pregnant women in their third trimester (after 28 weeks) are more likely to be seriously unwell and have a higher risk of their baby being born prematurely if they develop COVID-19. The COVID-19 vaccination is designed to provide lasting protection and keep pregnant mothers and babies safe.

Where can I get the vaccine?

Visit a walk-in clinic

If you are pregnant, you can get your COVID-19 vaccine from a number of walk-in and pop-up clinics all across south east London.

As the information is constantly updated, please check the link for the latest information about a vaccination clinic near you.

Book my appointment online

If you’re pregnant, you can book your vaccine appointment via the National Booking Service. If you’ve already booked a vaccination appointment through a GP or local NHS service, you do not need to book again.

I have questions about the vaccine

We know you might have questions about the vaccine – from how it was made, how it was approved quickly, to questions about any side effects – and that’s ok.

If you are unsure about getting vaccinated whilst pregnant, facts from trusted sources like the NHS, Royal College of Midwives and Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists can help you decide.

Book a conversation with a healthcare professional

If you have any questions or concerns about the COVID-19 vaccination, you can book a free confidential conversation with a healthcare professional via the Covid Helpline. You will be called back by a local pharmacist who will be able to give you the latest information on the vaccination and answer any questions you may have.

Book a slot for a conversation with a clinician at a specified time or ring the automated phoneline: 07828 499044

Read these questions and answers to help you make your choice more confidently

COVID-19 infection is still circulating and can be serious for pregnant women. So, it is important to have both doses of your COVID-19 vaccine to protect you and your unborn baby.

No, this is untrue. There’s no evidence the COVID-19 vaccines have any effect on your chances of becoming pregnant, and the vaccines cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

None of the vaccines contains a live virus and so there is no risk that the pregnant woman or her baby could get Covid-19 from the vaccine.

The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines are safe and effective. They give you the best protection against COVID-19. Millions of people and thousands of pregnant women have been safely vaccinated in the UK and worldwide.

All vaccines used in the UK must be approved by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). The MHRA makes sure the vaccines meet strict international standards for safety, quality, and effectiveness. Once a vaccine is approved, it’s closely monitored to continue to make sure it is safe and effective.

Pregnant women who had the AstraZeneca vaccine for their first dose can have a different vaccine for their second dose. The second dose is important for longer lasting protection against COVID-19.
It is safe and effective to have a different vaccine for your second dose and this is in current guidance.
 
If you are unsure about having a different vaccine for your second dose, speak with a midwife, obstetrician or GP. You can also use the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists decision aid on vaccination in pregnancy to support your choice.

COVID-19 vaccines offer pregnant women the best protection against COVID-19 disease which can be serious in later pregnancy for some women.

Although the overall risk from COVID-19 disease in pregnant women and their new babies is low, in later pregnancy some women may become seriously unwell and need hospital treatment.

Pregnant women who had the AstraZeneca vaccine for their first dose now have the option to have a different vaccine for their second dose. The second dose will be important for longer lasting protection against COVID-19.


Previously, you could continue with AstraZeneca, or defer your second dose until after you gave birth. However, guidance has changed and it is safe and effective to have a different vaccine for your second dose.


If you are unsure about having a different vaccine for your second dose, you should arrange to speak to a midwife, obstetrician or GP. You can also use the Royal College of Obstetricians & Gynaecologists decision aid on vaccination in pregnancy to support your choice.

No, this is untrue. More and more younger people, who are less likely to be vaccinated, are getting COVID-19 and becoming seriously ill. This includes pregnant women who have a higher risk of intensive care admission than women of the same age who are not pregnant. Women with COVID-19 disease are also 2 to 3 times more likely to have their babies early than women without COVID-19.

More than 81,000 pregnant women in England have received COVID-19 vaccines to date.

The MHRA is reviewing reports of suspected side effects of menstrual disorders (period problems) and unexpected vaginal bleeding following vaccination against COVID-19 in the UK. The rigorous evaluation completed to date does not support a link between changes to menstrual periods and related symptoms and COVID-19 vaccines.

The menstrual changes reported are mostly transient in nature. The MHRA continues to closely review reports of suspected side effects of menstrual disorders and unexpected vaginal bleeding.

More people are likely to get flu this winter
as fewer people will have built up natural immunity to it during the COVID-19 pandemic. If you get flu and COVID-19 at the same time, research shows you’re more likely to be seriously ill. So, getting vaccinated against flu and COVID-19 will provide protection for you and those around you for both these serious illnesses.

Yes, if you’re able to, it’s important to have the flu vaccine (jab) and the coronavirus vaccine. You should wait 1 week after you’ve had your flu vaccine (jab) before you get the coronavirus vaccine.

Yes. Studies have shown that it’s safe to have the flu vaccine during any stage of pregnancy, from the first few weeks up to your expected due date. Women who have had the flu vaccine while pregnant also pass some protection on to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives. It’s safe for women who are breastfeeding to have the vaccine.

The best time to have the flu vaccine is during the months from September to March. This is when flu is most prevalent. You can have the flu vaccination at any point during your pregnancy. This will be offered by your GP or your midwife.

If you have any further worries or concerns about having a vaccination in pregnancy, please discuss this with your midwife or visit: https://www.nhs.uk/pregnancy/keeping-well/vaccinations/ for more information.